Tag Archives | photography

The Royal Anthropological Institute’s Body Canvas Photography Competition

The RAI’s Body Canvas photo competition aims to:
• promote public engagement with the RAI’s Education Outreach Programme
• provide a platform for people to share their work and become
actively involved in anthropology
• develop an understanding for the personal, social and political
reasons why people undergo permanent body modification
• explore the many ways in which communities around the world develop
and express relationships with their bodies
• explore the industry of body modification, the artists, doctors and
craftsmen who practise their trade

The submissions we are looking for:
Engaging photographs that explore biological, cross-cultural and
social elements of body art and modification in relation to these
categories:
1) Tattoos and Scarification
2) Piercings and Body Reshaping

Who can participate?…

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Ghosts, Giants and fairies: Classic Faked Photographs a slide show

Does the camera ever lie? A new exhibition shows that photography has been doing exactly that since its inception. From fairies at the bottom of the garden to ghostly visitors, here is a slide show of the best manipulated images (from the BBC Website).

• Faking It: Manipulated Photography Before Photoshop is at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York from 11 October

Ghost photo: ghost photo 2 from the Met exhibition

 

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Memory and photographs: reflections on the aftermath of the 3.11 disaster

 Fuyubi Nakamura, Institute for Art Anthropology at Tama Art University, Tokyo

Utstau Isatomae, Minamisanriku, Miyagi, June 2011

What would we look for if our hometown were swept away? Memory in material form? The tsunami—triggered by the massive earthquake that hit north-eastern Japan on 11 March last year—ruthlessly swallowed up several towns along the costal line, taking away the lives of numerous people.

Utstau Isatomae, Minamisanriku, Miyagi, July 2011

In the aftermath of the disaster, various kinds of local residents’ possessions—if they were deemed ‘valuable’—were rescued from the debris. These recovered items were often called omoide no shina or ‘objects of memory’, which included family albums, photographs and dolls among others. The items were then cleaned by volunteers and later displayed with the hope of reconnecting them with their owners, or their family or friends.…

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