Tag Archives | photography

Modeling Nostalgia

Randy Hage, 1/12th scale sculpture of Ideal Hosiery, located at 339 Grand St. New York, NY; 17" x 15" x 8"

Randy Hage, 1/12th scale sculpture of Ideal Hosiery, located at 339 Grand St. New York, NY; 17″ x 15″ x 8″

By Aaron Glass (Bard Graduate Center)

Armed with his camera, Randy Hage explores urban landscapes threatened with eradication through development, gentrification, or other civic improvement schemes. Yet unlike the many other salvage-oriented artists who photographically document such streetscapes lest they vanish, Hage translates his photos into meticulously crafted scale models. Rather than just imaging these places, he materializes them; in some cases, he re-materializes buildings that may have been destroyed since he photographed them. Through the laborious process of simulating structures along with their contents and immediate environs, Hage must develop a particular tactile as well as visual intimacy with the sites and buildings in question.…

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Call for Panels: Anthropology and Photography

 

The Royal Anthropological Institute will host an international conference on Anthropology and Photography at the British Museum, 29-31 May, 2014.

The aim of the Conference is to stimulate an international discussion on the place, role and future of photography.  Panel proposals are therefore welcome from any branch of anthropology. We welcome contributions from researchers and practitioners working in museums, academia, media, the arts and anyone who is engaged with historical or contemporary production and use of images.

Panels can draw upon (but are not limited to) the following themes:

  • The use of photography across anthropological disciplines
  • The changing place of photography in museums and exhibitions
  • Photography and globalisation
  • Photography, film and fine art
  • Revisiting and re-contextualising archival images
  • Photography and public engagement
  • Ethics, copyright, access and distribution of images
  • Technological innovation and its impact
  • Regional photography practices
  • Visual method and photo theory

The call for panels opens on 1 August 2013 and closes on 31 October 2013

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Twentysix Gasoline Stations on the Dhaka-Chittagong Highway

Christopher Pinney, UCL Anthropology

National Highway One spans the 287km between Dhaka and Teknaf Upazila, connecting the Bangladeshi capital with Chittagong, the second largest city.  These photographs, taken over two days in late January 2013, document 26 of the more interesting gas stations on the south bound highway, en-route Chittagong. There are around 9,000 petrol stations and 584 Compressed Natural Gas (CNG) stations in Bangladesh. Most stations on N1 have CNG which is produced in Bangladesh and used by all autorickshaws and many buses and trucks.

These photographs pay homage to Ed Ruscha’s Twentysix Gasoline Stations published in 1963 which recorded 26 gas stations between Los Angeles and Oklahoma City. Ruscha’s images were shot and printed in black and white although some of them formed the basis for a colour screen-print series.…

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Who Owns What in the Digital Age?

From the Jewish Museum Blog:

Marc Adelman’s Stelen (Columns) (2007–11) was included in The Jewish Museum exhibitionComposed: Identity, Politics, Sex (Dec. 23, 2011–June 30, 2012). The work comprises a set of photographs Adelman found on a gay dating website. Following a published review of the exhibition, the Museum received complaints from several people whose profile pictures were featured in Stelen. Their comments focused on privacy issues—the inclusion of their images in the artwork without their consent—and the possibility that as a result of being depicted publicly in the work they might be subject to significant anti-gay backlash. (See statement.) We have invited Marc Adelman and a range of experts to address some of the complex issues raised by the artwork

The Jewish Museum Blog » Blog Archive » Who Owns What in the Digital Age.…

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Control Order House

Control Order House is the latest project of the artist, photographer and archivist Edmund Clark.

Clark’s first project, Guantanamo: If the Light Goes Out, explored the domestic architecture and environment of the Guantanamo Bay Military Base and tracked this “domesticity” back into the homes of British detainees, particularly following the case of  Omar Deghayes who was imprisoned in GTMO from 2002-2007 when he was released without charges. This photographic project explores three ideas of home: the idea that GTMO is home to an American community of military personnel and their families, that it is home to prisoners arrested as terrorists, and the homes where former detainees are now trying to rebuild their lives.

“Control Order House continues my exploration of the use and representation of control and incarceration in the ‘War on Terror’.

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Between Art and Information: Collecting Photographs

One Day Meeting, Leicester

Saturday March 2nd, 2013

Museums and Galleries History Group/Photographic History Research Centre, De Montfort University

Registration: www.mghg.org/collectingphotographs/

The status of photographs in the history of museum collections is a complex one. From the inception of the medium its double capacity as an aesthetic form and as a recording medium created tensions about its place in the hierarchy of museum objects.  While museums had been amassing photographs since about 1850, it was, for instance, only in the 1970s that the first senior curators of photographs were appointed in UK museums. On the one hand major collections of ‘art’ photography have grown in status and visibility, while photographs not designated  ‘art’ are often invisible in museums. On the other hand almost every museum has photographs as part of its ecosystem, gathered as information, corroboration or documentation, shaping the understanding of other classes of objects.…

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Studio Suhag! a vernacular photographic archive in India.

Christopher Pinney, Dept of Anthropology, UCL

The name is Studio Suhag. The location is a small industrial town in central India, exactly half-way between Mumbai and Delhi. The photographer is Suresh Punjabi. The images are scanned from medium-format negatives recently retrieved from Suresh’s monsoon damaged godown.  He calls it a godown (warehouse) but actually it is half a floor in a rented house in which a sudden influx of monsoon rain had dislodged tens of thousands of negs, all carefully filed and sequenced, transforming an ordered archive into a mouldering mush on the floor. Several days of careful sifting produced maybe a thousand printable negatives, the rest remain on the floor in an increasingly jumbled mess.

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The earliest images date from the late 1970s, the most recent ones from the mid-1980s. …

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CFP: Forthcoming book: The Photograph and the Album

Deadline for Abstracts: Oct 1, 2012

We invite international submissions to be included in this forthcoming book, The Photograph and the Album, to be published by MuseumsEtc [www.museumsetc.com] in 2013, edited by Rosie Miller, Jonathan Carson and Theresa Wilkie from the School of Art & Design, University of Salford, UK.

The photograph album carries the potential to convey meaning beyond the images contained within it. However, the long history of the photograph and the album is currently changing because of the way in which we are now making and using photographs. This could be seen as a challenge to the album or viewed as an opportunity to take us in new directions and offer alternative interpretations.

We welcome submissions of between 2000-6000 words from writers, academics, curators, photographers, artists and other visual
practitioners.…

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PhD Studentship: PHOTOGRAPHS, MUSEUMS AND ARCHAEOLOGY

AHRC CDA PhD Studentship

PHOTOGRAPHS, MUSEUMS AND ARCHAEOLOGY

“Alfred Maudslay, Photography and the Mimetic Technologies of Archaeology: A Study in Method, Process and Effect”

Photographic History Research Centre, De Montfort University, Leicester/ British Museum, London


STARTING JANUARY 2013

An AHRC-funded Collaborative Doctoral Award studentship covering stipend and tuition fee costs is offered within the Photographic History Research Centre (PHRC) in the Faculty of Art, Design and Humanities in collaboration with the British Museum. 

The project addresses the role of photography and its relationship with other mimetic technologies in field archaeology and the subsequent institutional life of the images in the construction of ‘heritage’. The project also explores the methodological implications for a ‘photographic history’ approach to collections and institutions. 

The project will focus on the 1513 magnificent late nineteenth century photographs made of Maya archaeology by Alfred Maudslay, their relationship with other kinds of recording and their subsequent ‘life’ in the Museum.

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The Burning House: What People Would Take If The House Was on Fire

A pictorial meditation on how we construct our identity through objects and material possessions.

If your house suddenly caught on fire, what would you grab as you fled out the door? That’s precisely the question Foster Huntington asked himself, so he gathered the belongings he himself would take and photographed them, then asked a few friends to do the same. Then, on May 10 of 2011, he launched The Burning House with 10 such photographs. Within a few hours, he got his first submission from a complete stranger.

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