Tag Archives | music

CFP: Music Flows, IASPM-US Annual Conference

Water Flows 33_29_9_web

March 13-16, 2014 

University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill

Submission Deadline: Friday, 15 November, 2013

Music flows. Evocative metaphorically while directing our attention to the global circulation of songs, the theme for the 2014 IASPM-US Annual Conference takes its inspiration from the UNC campus-wide Water initiative. Water in its many forms is a ubiquitous subject of pop songs. Whether as metaphor or literal reference, water imagery as a theme in popular music has been used to celebrate identity, express emotions, address environmental issues, convey pleasure, pay homage to spiritual beings, and shape communities of resistance. Here we take up notions of fluidity and flow to address not only what many deem our most important natural resource, but to consider the ways in which water’s qualities may yield productive insights into the present and future of popular music.…

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Music for Gracious Living: Learning about Lifestyle from LPs

Janet Borgerson and Jonathan Schroeder, Rochester Institute of Technology

 

Music for Gracious Living: Barbeque, Columbia Records, 1955 An Exciting Evening at Home, Cameo Records, 1962 Music for Gracious Living: Buffet, Columbia Records, 1955 Music for a French Dinner at Home, RCA Victor, 1958

 

This project finds us concerned with how home is conceptualized, enacted, and consumed. We are interested in exploring how the US home became an entertainment zone – and an alternative to ‘going out’ – in postwar popular culture. In the West, notions historically linked to home include domesticity, intimacy, and privacy; austerity, efficiency, and comfort; and nostalgia and style (Rybczynski 1987). The shifts away from public, feudal households to “the private, family home” with its increasing domestic intimacy “affected not only our physical surroundings, but our consciousness as well” (Rybczynski, 1987, 49).…

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Call for Tracks: Radarstation 2

Fantomton is looking for musicians for a sound-project based on samples taken at the abandoned listening station at Teufelsberg Berlin.

The abandoned listening station on the Teufelsberg Berlin has a magical atmosphere. The industrial area with its rusty metal surfaces, broken glass and the unique acoustic in the domes provide a rich repertoire of fascinating sounds which reflect the area’s ambience. We could not resist the attraction of the place and visited it in 2009, equipped with microphones and recording devices. Subsequently the recordings were given to musicians in order to get different interpretations of the sound material. The goal was to translate the impressions of the place into music. The result is the release Radarstation: fantomton.de/releases/music/ft001-radarstation

Due to great interest and a lot of positive reactions in the recent time, we once more would like to motivate artists to use our sound material to produce new exciting tracks. Deadline is the 25 November 2012.…

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CFP: Nostalgias, Special Issue of Volume!

Call for papers: Nostalgias: A special issue of Volume! The French Journal of Popular Music Studies

Edited by Hugh Dauncey (Newcastle University) & Christopher Tinker (Heriot-Watt University)

Online: volume.revues.org/2914

Version française ici : volume.revues.org/2912

Volume!, the French peer-reviewed journal dedicated to the interdisciplinary study of popular music – seeks contributions for a special issue on nostalgia and popular music in a variety of national, international and transnational contexts.

This issue will explore the ways in which popular-music-related nostalgia is produced, represented, mediatised and consumed. Morris B. Holbrook and Robert M. Schindler define nostalgia as “A preference (general liking, positive attitude or favourable effect) towards experiences associated with objects (people, places or things) that were more common (popular, fashionable or widely circulated) when one was younger (in early adulthood, in adolescence, in childhood or even before birth)” (2006: 108).…

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