Tag Archives | disability

Lloyd Coleman on How He Has Music at His Fingertips

Annamaria Dall’Anese – PhD Anthropology

 

 

Lloyd Coleman on How He Has Music at His Fingertips

 

Anthropology’s aim is to see the world through the native’s point of view (Malinowski 1961[1922]:25), and intersubjectivity is often the trigger of fruitful ethnographic discoveries, as well as human bonds in general (Jackson 1998:65). But what happens when a disparity between the sensory endowments of the actors intervenes in their encounter? To answer such an anthropological question, we turn to the relationship that Lloyd Coleman has with sound, music, and his clarinet. Educated at the Royal Academy of Music and recently appointed Associate Music Director of the Paraorchestra, the world’s only large-scale ensemble of disabled musicians, he is a hearing- (and visually) impaired composer.

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Is it time for a new wheelchair access icon?

At the BBC an article discussing the growing movement to re-evaluate the significance of the wheelchair access icon. Critics and activists are proposing a symbol that is more dynamic, than the passive sitting person in the old icon. The Accessible Icon Project:

provides supplies and services to transform the old International Symbol of Access into an active, engaged image. We think visual representation matters. People with disabilities have a long history of being spoken for, of being rendered passive in decisions about their lives. The old icon, while a milestone in ADA history, displays that passivity: its arms and legs are drawn like mechanical parts, its posture is unnaturally erect, and its entire look is one that make the chair, not the person, important and visible. 

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