Tag Archives: Digital Media

Special Issue of MAR on digital repatriation

The most recent issue of the open-source journal Museum Anthropology Review is focussed on digital media and the return of cultural knowledge and patrimony from museums to source communities, with an emphasis on current collaborative projects (including some by your friendly neighborhood Material World editors and contributors). Check it out!

Museum Anthropology Review Vol 7, No 1-2 (2013): After the Return: Digital Repatriation and the Circulation of Indigenous Knowledge.

scholarworks.iu.edu/journals/index.php/mar/issue/view/233

CODE – A Media, Games and Art Conference

Swinburne University of Technology, Melbourne, Australia, 21-23 November 2012

KEYNOTE SPEAKERS
Jussi Parikka – Reader, Winchester School of Art
Christian McCrea – Program Director for Games, RMIT University
Anna Munster – Associate Professor at the College of Fine Arts, UNSW

DESCRIPTION

Code can be defined in two distinct but related ways: as an underlying technological process, a set of rules and instructions governing, for instance, the permutations of all those 0s and 1s obscured behind user interfaces, but also as a cultural framework navigated and understood socially and performatively, as is the case with legal, social and behavioural codes. As an operative principle, code’s significance thus extends far deeper than its current digital manifestation. For this conference, we invite submissions of papers and creative works that consider the role of code as a simultaneously material and semiotic force that operates across the wider cultural, social and political field, with particular emphasis on media, games and art.

Code is the invisible force at the heart of contemporary media and games, routinely obscured by the gadget fetish of breathless tech marketing and scholarly focus on more visible social and technical interfaces. With the recent material turn in media studies and the refinement of new approaches including software studies and platform politics, which emphasise interrogating the formal characteristics and underlying technical architecture of contemporary media, the time has come to bring code out into the open.

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CFP: Social Media, Digital Network and Globalization

China New Media Communication Association Annual Conference, Macao International Conference Macao SAR, China, Dec 6 – 8, 2012

Conference Website: www.umac.mo/fsh/comm/newmediaconference/en/en.htm2012

Abstracts & final papers should be submitted via e-mail to the following address: 2012newmediacon@gmail.com; the abstract submission deadline is  July 15, 2012

The 2012 China New Media Communication Association Annual Conference, Macao International Conference, co-organized by the Department of Communication, University of Macao and China New Media Communication Association (CNMCA) will be held in Macao, a charming enclave of Eastern and Western cultures. We sincerely invite colleagues from all parts of the world to come to Macao, and share with us your ideas about communication and social media.

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Call for essays: The “Newness” of New Media

Special themed issue of
Culture Theory and Critique
Editors Ilana Gershon, Indiana University (igershon@indiana.edu) and Joshua A. Bell, NMNH, Smithsonian Institution (bellja@si.edu)
Outside of the West, communities have traditionally innovated and engaged different forms of media, whether using textiles, dog’s teeth, valuables or abacus. These myriad forms remain integral to the networks of communications and relations. Today the new media technologies of the Internet, mobile phones and social networking sites provide another venue for innovation and continuity. Within the Western context, historians of media have demonstrated how new media sparks exaggerated fears that intimate connections will be harmed when a technology is introduced. Thus part of the “newness” of new media is an often-repeated expectation that new forms of representation will disrupt established social organization.
In this special issue, we hope to explore how the “newness” of new media is experienced outside of Euro-America, ranging from how communities have and are responding to the introduction of writing to the introduction of mobile phones and social networking sites. This has a strong historical component; many of our questions arise from the aftermath of colonial encounters. Two themes guide these ethnographic explorations: the “newness” of new media for dialogue and the “newness” of new media for representation.

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