Tag Archives | digital culture

On Scanning Fluff

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I’ve been working on a paper for a workshop on “Transforming data: drawing otherness into data debates” next week. I will be talking about one of  my current research projects, Te Ara Wairua – Pathways of the Intangible. In collaboration with Kura Puke and Stuart Foster of Massey University and Te Matahiapo Research Organization in Aotearoa New Zealand we have been exploring how digital technologies can connect to a Maori Korowai (cloak) held currently in the UCL Ethnography Collections.

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Tukutuku roimata, I.0013, see, ethcat.museums.ucl.ac.uk/detail.aspx?parentpriref=[/caption]

Together we are developing a critical perspective on the ways in which digital technologies can, or cannot, be used to connect communities to far away collections. We all have different interests and investments in the project, and these have generated different research questions.…

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CFP: International Free Software Workshop 2013 (Porto Alegre, Brazil)

Deadline for Proposals: 20 February 2013

Website: softwarelivre.org/wsl

From the pioneer software sharing communities created around UNIX to the community of Emacs hackers and beyond, Free and Open Source Software (FOSS) development has been growing exponentially, following the popularization and widespread usage of personal computers and the Internet. Not only have FOSS communities expanded globally, but also its body of literature, becoming relevant for computer scientists and engineers, as well as for researchers in the humanities and social sciences. In the past decade, FOSS research was consolidated around questions such as individual motivation, collaborative practices, issues of scale, governance, and coordination of development efforts, as well as problems of political economy, involving the study of economic models, and forms of political mobilization around Free Software.

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CFP: Internet Memes and Visual Culture, Journal of Visual Culture

A themed Special Issue of Journal of Visual Culture

Issue Guest Editors: Laine Nooney (Stony Brook University) and Laura Portwood-Stacer (New York University)

Deadline for Proposals: 15 January 2013

The Editors are currently seeking proposed contributions for a Special Issue of the *Journal of Visual Culture* on Internet Memes and Visual Culture, to be published December 2014. The term *meme*, a portmanteau of * mimesis* and *gene*, was minted in 1976 by British ethologist and evolutionary biologist Richard Dawkins. Dawkins proposed the meme as a “unit of cultural transmission,” a self-perpetuating cultural phenomenon analogous to the gene as a replicator of biological data. Almost 40 years later, the term “meme” has become the coin of the realm within Internet subcultures, particularly on microblogging and social network platforms. In these contexts the designation “meme” identifies digital objects that riff on a given visual, textual or auditory form.…

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