Tag Archives | design

Exhibition: “An American Style: Global Sources for New York Textile and Fashion Design 1915–1928″

On View September 27, 2013–February 2, 2014

At the Bard Graduate Center, New York, NY

Walter Mitschke for H. R. Mallinson & Co. Drawing for “Zuni Tribe,” ca. 1927. Pencil and gouache on paper. Museum of Fine Arts Boston, Gift of Robert and Joan Brancale, 2008.1950.35.

Walter Mitschke for H. R. Mallinson & Co. Drawing for “Zuni Tribe,” ca. 1927. Pencil and gouache on paper. Museum of Fine Arts Boston, Gift of Robert and Joan Brancale, 2008.1950.35.

By Ann Marguerite Tartsinis, Curator of the Exhibition

An American Style: Global Sources for New York Textile and Fashion Design, 1915-1928 examines the efforts of the American Museum of Natural History to educate and inspire New York textile and fashion designers during and after World War I. This remarkable exhibition features rare textiles and garments ranging from a 1920’s hand-batiked caftan-style dress and mass-market hand-blocked silks to Native American and other indigenous dress. Never-before-seen photographs, objects, and design manuals will be on view.…

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Is it time for a new wheelchair access icon?

At the BBC an article discussing the growing movement to re-evaluate the significance of the wheelchair access icon. Critics and activists are proposing a symbol that is more dynamic, than the passive sitting person in the old icon. The Accessible Icon Project:

provides supplies and services to transform the old International Symbol of Access into an active, engaged image. We think visual representation matters. People with disabilities have a long history of being spoken for, of being rendered passive in decisions about their lives. The old icon, while a milestone in ADA history, displays that passivity: its arms and legs are drawn like mechanical parts, its posture is unnaturally erect, and its entire look is one that make the chair, not the person, important and visible. As people with disabilities of all kinds—not just chair users—create greater rights and opportunities for social, political, and cultural participation, we think cities should evolve their images of accessibility too.

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Why do you like your beer in a glass?

So why do we prefer to have our beer in glasses rather than in plastic cups? After all, plastic cups are much more practical: they don’t break, they are easily disposable, and they can’t be used to attack people. Beer glasses, however, do tend to break, they cannot be easily disposed of, and are often used to attack people (in the UK, for example, more than 5,000 are attacked with glasses every year , costing the health service more than £2bn).

So why then, do we keep using glass to drink beer?

The answer to this mystery can be found in Mark Miodownik‘s upcoming book, Stuff Matters. The book is not out yet, but you can read a great excerpt published in The Guardian a few days ago here.

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Shiny, happy households: Formica turns 100

Laminate fever ... an advertisement for Formica from the 1950s. Photograph: Picture Post/Getty.

Laminate fever … an advertisement for Formica from the 1950s. Photograph: Picture Post/Getty.

By  (forwarded by Fiona McDonald)

The Guardian, Wednesday 16 January 2013

It has lined the interiors of everything from greasy spoon cafes to luxury cruise liners, from hospital wards to train cabins – bringing a fusion of wipe-clean practicality and sleek modern style. And now Formica is celebrating its 100th birthday. The brave new seamless surface of the future is officially an antique.

While it may now be synonymous with the retro glamour of 1950s compact kitchens and roadside diners, the origins of the miracle material are much more mundane. Invented in Cincinnati in 1913 by engineers Daniel O’Conor and Herbert Faber, Formica laminate was designed to be an electrical insulator, to serve as a replacement for the silicate mineral mica – hence “for mica”.…

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CFP: STS Southern California Winter Retreat

Deadline: 15 December 2012

Dates: Friday February 22, Saturday February 23, and Sunday February 24

Location: Borrego Springs, Anza-Borrego Desert (en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anza-Borrego_Desert), exact location TBA

Doctoral students, postdoctoral fellows, and faculty from across California are invited to the inaugural Southern California Winter STS retreat. This retreat is designed for a select group of graduate students, postdoctoral fellows, and faculty advance their research projects in the field of STS, broadly defined, and in so doing to advance an emergent set of problematics and topical foci in STS itself. The emphasis will be on intellectual play. It is not intended to be a training workshop, and graduate students will be expected to participate in the same manner as other participants. Collectively, we will explore each others’ topics through a series of focused discussions as well as small-group engagements with the Anza-Borrego environment.…

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CODE – A Media, Games and Art Conference

Swinburne University of Technology, Melbourne, Australia, 21-23 November 2012

KEYNOTE SPEAKERS Jussi Parikka – Reader, Winchester School of Art Christian McCrea – Program Director for Games, RMIT University Anna Munster – Associate Professor at the College of Fine Arts, UNSW

DESCRIPTION

Code can be defined in two distinct but related ways: as an underlying technological process, a set of rules and instructions governing, for instance, the permutations of all those 0s and 1s obscured behind user interfaces, but also as a cultural framework navigated and understood socially and performatively, as is the case with legal, social and behavioural codes. As an operative principle, code’s significance thus extends far deeper than its current digital manifestation. For this conference, we invite submissions of papers and creative works that consider the role of code as a simultaneously material and semiotic force that operates across the wider cultural, social and political field, with particular emphasis on media, games and art.…

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Experiments in (and out of) the studio: Art and Design Methods for Science and Technology Studies

Tuesday October 16th, 2012 10:30AM-5:30PM

Copenhagen Business School, Copenhagen

The organizers invite participation in an interdisciplinary one-day hands-on workshop on emerging methods of critical practice in science and technology studies, in particular methods that engage with art and design as well as performance and exhibition. Ultimately, we aim to refine our understanding and also intervene in the way that objects can stimulate and embody critique in STS.

If you are interested in participating, please send a brief (3-5 sentences) expression of interest and a short 250-word bio or CV to Dehlia Hannah dh2058@columbia.edu by October 8th at 5pm EST. Please put ‘Pre-EASST Workshop’ in the subject heading.…

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