Tag Archives: code

CFP: International Free Software Workshop 2013 (Porto Alegre, Brazil)

Deadline for Proposals: 20 February 2013

Website: softwarelivre.org/wsl

From the pioneer software sharing communities created around UNIX to the community of Emacs hackers and beyond, Free and Open Source Software (FOSS) development has been growing exponentially, following the popularization and widespread usage of personal computers and the Internet. Not only have FOSS communities expanded globally, but also its body of literature, becoming relevant for computer scientists and engineers, as well as for researchers in the humanities and social sciences. In the past decade, FOSS research was consolidated around questions such as individual motivation, collaborative practices, issues of scale, governance, and coordination of development efforts, as well as problems of political economy, involving the study of economic models, and forms of political mobilization around Free Software.

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CODE – A Media, Games and Art Conference

Swinburne University of Technology, Melbourne, Australia, 21-23 November 2012

KEYNOTE SPEAKERS
Jussi Parikka – Reader, Winchester School of Art
Christian McCrea – Program Director for Games, RMIT University
Anna Munster – Associate Professor at the College of Fine Arts, UNSW

DESCRIPTION

Code can be defined in two distinct but related ways: as an underlying technological process, a set of rules and instructions governing, for instance, the permutations of all those 0s and 1s obscured behind user interfaces, but also as a cultural framework navigated and understood socially and performatively, as is the case with legal, social and behavioural codes. As an operative principle, code’s significance thus extends far deeper than its current digital manifestation. For this conference, we invite submissions of papers and creative works that consider the role of code as a simultaneously material and semiotic force that operates across the wider cultural, social and political field, with particular emphasis on media, games and art.

Code is the invisible force at the heart of contemporary media and games, routinely obscured by the gadget fetish of breathless tech marketing and scholarly focus on more visible social and technical interfaces. With the recent material turn in media studies and the refinement of new approaches including software studies and platform politics, which emphasise interrogating the formal characteristics and underlying technical architecture of contemporary media, the time has come to bring code out into the open.

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