Tag Archives: British Museum

Call for Panels: Anthropology and Photography

 

The Royal Anthropological Institute will host an international conference on Anthropology and Photography at the British Museum, 29-31 May, 2014.

The aim of the Conference is to stimulate an international discussion on the place, role and future of photography.  Panel proposals are therefore welcome from any branch of anthropology. We welcome contributions from researchers and practitioners working in museums, academia, media, the arts and anyone who is engaged with historical or contemporary production and use of images.

Panels can draw upon (but are not limited to) the following themes:

  • The use of photography across anthropological disciplines
  • The changing place of photography in museums and exhibitions
  • Photography and globalisation
  • Photography, film and fine art
  • Revisiting and re-contextualising archival images
  • Photography and public engagement
  • Ethics, copyright, access and distribution of images
  • Technological innovation and its impact
  • Regional photography practices
  • Visual method and photo theory

The call for panels opens on 1 August 2013 and closes on 31 October 2013

Call for Papers: the In Betweenness of Things

The In-Betweenness of Things: 

Materializing Mediation and Movement between Worlds

A One-Day Symposium at The British Museum

22 March 2013

This one-day symposium is scheduled to coincide with the Sowei Mask: Spirit of Sierra Leone exhibition, on display at The British Museum between 14 February and 27 April 2013. The mask at the centre of the exhibition could be said to mediate between worlds. It materializes the interconnectivity between the worlds of the colonized and the colonizer in 19th-century West Africa. On the one hand it represents the radical ‘otherness’ of an African masquerade tradition, on the other hand it illustrates how those very traditions incorporated Western objects – such as the European top hat – and made  them symbols of power. This hybrid object is neither purely African, nor purely European, but exists in a space between. Aside from its ritual context in which the mask mediates between the domain of the spirits and that of humankind, it speaks of the multi-directional mobility of people and things as well as the entanglement of culture and power in the late 19th century. Today, the mask mediates between the museum and its communities, including diasporic communities who live ‘between’ London and Sierra Leone.

Continue reading