Tag Archives | Art

The Mechanical Postcard

Adam Drazin, UCL Anthropology

  • • Is it possible to communicate material properties and senses across long distances?
  • • How do exchange and sharing play a part in the understanding of material properties?
  • • How can artistic work help us understand material culture?

In April, a collaborative Skype workshop, The First Encounter, was held between members of the School of Material and Visual Culture, Massey University in New Zealand, and UCL Anthropology  in London.  During the workshop, we presented a year’s worth of work on material properties conducted by working with various heritage artifacts made of different materials.  The intention was to discover if, and how, we could think about the evasive cultural topic of what properties are, and whether we could use the stimulus of having to communicate across the breadth of the globe to find new ways of thinking about and representing them.…

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Figuring Exchange: Art and Money

IMTFI fe_poster_web

How is money more than mere container and conveyor of value?
What happens to money we destroy, alter, or simply stop using?
How do the materials and the making of money matter?

Artists and craftspeople are highly attuned to these questions of money, aesthetics, and exchange. Political cartoonists offer direct commentary on the dramas of money; conceptual artists play with money’s materials and meanings through theory and technique; non-Western valuables make apparent the close connection between the making of objects and the making of value. This exhibition includes installations made of out of circulation Mexican bills by Argentine artist Máximo González; the art of trompe l’oeil painter G.B. Tate and others; as well as a variety of money and non-Western valuables.…

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CFP: Collecting Geographies – Global Programming and Museums of Modern Art

Organized by Stedelijk Museum, Amsterdam; ASCA/ACGS University of
Amsterdam, Amsterdam; Moderna Museet, Stockholm; Folkwang Museum,
Essen;Tropen Museum, Amsterdam

Location: Stedelijk Museum, Amsterdam
Dates: 13-15 March 2014
Deadline for papers: September 30, 2013
Admittance fee: €100,-

Key-note speakers / panel participants
James Clifford, Sarat Maharaj, Annie Coombes
Kader Attia, Wendelien van Oldenborgh, Daniel Birnbaum and Tobia
Bezzola.

For the latest information on key-note speakers and panel participants
please keep an eye on our website: www.stedelijk.nl/en

Introduction
Against the backdrop of globalization today, museums for modern and
contemporary art in the West are inclined to pay serious attention to
the acquisition and presentation of art from all over the world, beyond
the still prevalent dominance of European and North American art. Given,
on the one hand, the extreme concentration of internationally operating
art institutions in Western  Europe and the United States, and the often
radically different self-understanding of non-Western art institutions
on the other, the institutional claims to the global need to be
reviewed, contextualized and contested.…

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Conference Report–“Disturbing Pasts: Memories, Controversies and Creativity”

This summer saw the conclusion of ‘Disturbing Pasts: Memories, Controversies and Creativity’, an international research project led by Leon Wainwright (Department of Art History, The Open University, UK) which began in December 2011. (For an overview of the project, visit: www.open.ac.uk/Arts/disturbing-pasts/ )

The main focus of Disturbing Pasts was a major conference that took place over three days at the Museum of Ethnology, Vienna (recently renamed Weltmuseum Vienna) on 20-22 November 2012. The majority of speakers were from outside academia, the event was free to attend and widely publicised, while ample time was allowed for discussion and interaction with the audience and for networking among participants. It consisted of panels of highly-illustrated presentations on five distinct yet complementary themes. Each panel combined speakers from the three selected groupings of stakeholders (artists, curators and academics) and saw a productive exchange between them.…

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“Plastic” Art: The Work of Maika’i Tubbs

By Fiona McDonald (University College London) 

Maika'i Tubbs, "A Life of Its Own," 2010, plastic forks, spoons, knives

Maika’i Tubbs, “A Life of Its Own,” 2010, plastic forks, spoons, knives

During the 2013 Sakàhan: International Indigenous Art quinquennial exhibition at the National Gallery of Canada, the complexity of the materiality of many works was explored through a series of interviews with artists who were on site at the gallery to install their works. While many intricate threads are interwoven throughout the Sakàhan curatorial project, the main focus stems from the ambition to create an exhibition that explores, on an international level, what it means to be indigenous today.

Prior to the closing of the exhibition on 2 September 2013, The National Gallery published a short interview with Hawaiian artist Maika’i Tubbs presenting the scope of his multi-media plastic art installation.…

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Topsy Turvy: Artists and the Amusement Utopia

60 Wall St. Gallery, New York, NY

Now trough October 23.

www.db.com/us/content/en/1094.html

 

by Aaron Beebe (Independent Artist and Curator)

exhibit 1

A lot has been said about the changes that modernism brought to cultural producers beginning in the late 19th century, but one piece to consider adding to study of avant-gardes is the unrecognized freedom of the amusement industry for creative individuals.

In June, I curated an exhibition at the gallery at 60 Wall St. that pulls together a host of artists who work in and around Coney Island, and who have found that working in an amusement park offers extremely rewarding creative possibilities for their lives and work.

A century ago, there was a revolution in Western ideas of work and leisure that opened up new opportunities for creative entrepreneurs to make their marks on the world.…

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Surveillance and Waste

From our friends at Discard Studies a post about a surveillance based art project

In her much-lauded series Stranger Visions, artist Heather Dewey-Hagborg creates busts from discarded genetic material collected in public places. It began sitting in a therapists office here in New York City, where she saw a hair lodged in a piece of furniture. “I stared at it for an hour,” she says. “I couldn’t stop wondering who it belonged to, and what I could find out about that person.” (Science Magazine). Based on her reading of forensic DNA prototyping, she took 11 found hairs and tested their DNA in a genetics lab. She then built three dimensional masks of those people based on the information she received about eye color, geographical roots, sex, and other traits (though an exact facial reconstruction from such testing is not possible– that is the stuff of science fiction and CSI-style television shows).

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The Tool at Hand

The exhibition,  The Tool at Hand asked what would it be like to create a work of art using only one tool?

In the Spring of 2011 the Chipstone Foundation and the Milwaukee Art Museum invited sixteen established artists from Britain and America to participate in an unusual experiment. Each artist was asked to lay aside his or her standard tool kit and craft a work of art with one tool alone. The challenge presented to the artists sounds simple: create a work of art with one tool. The material and tool were left open-ended with the purpose of encouraging creativity within the one-tool constraint. The Tool at Hand brings together these artworks, the tools that crafted them and short, explanatory videos produced by each artist.  …

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Twentysix Gasoline Stations on the Dhaka-Chittagong Highway

Christopher Pinney, UCL Anthropology

National Highway One spans the 287km between Dhaka and Teknaf Upazila, connecting the Bangladeshi capital with Chittagong, the second largest city.  These photographs, taken over two days in late January 2013, document 26 of the more interesting gas stations on the south bound highway, en-route Chittagong. There are around 9,000 petrol stations and 584 Compressed Natural Gas (CNG) stations in Bangladesh. Most stations on N1 have CNG which is produced in Bangladesh and used by all autorickshaws and many buses and trucks.

These photographs pay homage to Ed Ruscha’s Twentysix Gasoline Stations published in 1963 which recorded 26 gas stations between Los Angeles and Oklahoma City. Ruscha’s images were shot and printed in black and white although some of them formed the basis for a colour screen-print series.…

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Who Owns What in the Digital Age?

From the Jewish Museum Blog:

Marc Adelman’s Stelen (Columns) (2007–11) was included in The Jewish Museum exhibitionComposed: Identity, Politics, Sex (Dec. 23, 2011–June 30, 2012). The work comprises a set of photographs Adelman found on a gay dating website. Following a published review of the exhibition, the Museum received complaints from several people whose profile pictures were featured in Stelen. Their comments focused on privacy issues—the inclusion of their images in the artwork without their consent—and the possibility that as a result of being depicted publicly in the work they might be subject to significant anti-gay backlash. (See statement.) We have invited Marc Adelman and a range of experts to address some of the complex issues raised by the artwork

The Jewish Museum Blog » Blog Archive » Who Owns What in the Digital Age.…

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