Tag Archives | Archive

Announcing Transactions: a Payments archive

Reblogged from the blog of the Institute for Money, Technology and Financial Inclusion

Through 2013, the Institute for Money, Technology and Financial Inclusion has funded over 125 researchers in 38 countries. Every year they come together at the University of California, Irvine to share their research questions and conclusions. They also bring with them more tangible lessons: an incredibly diverse assortment of artifacts that also help to tell the still-unfolding story of mobile money.

We did not anticipate becoming a museum. But one of the important side-effects of our large and still-growing research network has been the accumulation of stuff: state and local currencies in multiple denominations, promotional material from mobile money deployments, and artifacts of everyday monetary practice, from cell phone sleeves to piggy banks.

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The Interference Archive

about_thearchive_2

The Interference Archive is an activist archive of political ephemera from radical social movements in the USA and around the world. Activist not only because of the subject matter of its collections but also in the way it is organized as a collection. Based in Gowanus, Brooklyn, and running on a budget of less than $25,000 a year, the archive is open to the public who are encouraged to touch, rummage, duplicate, appropriate and generally engage away from the white-glove model of museums and special collections. Based on the personal collections of Josh MacPhee and Dara Greenwald, the archive now describes itself as an open-access, open-stack archive:

 As an archive from below, we are a collectively run space that stresses the use of our collection over its preservation, offers open stacks and accessibility for all, works in collaboration with like-minded projects, and encourages critical as well as creative engagements with our own histories

Click here for a slideshow of the archive as featured in the NY Times.…

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Studio Suhag! a vernacular photographic archive in India.

Christopher Pinney, Dept of Anthropology, UCL

The name is Studio Suhag. The location is a small industrial town in central India, exactly half-way between Mumbai and Delhi. The photographer is Suresh Punjabi. The images are scanned from medium-format negatives recently retrieved from Suresh’s monsoon damaged godown.  He calls it a godown (warehouse) but actually it is half a floor in a rented house in which a sudden influx of monsoon rain had dislodged tens of thousands of negs, all carefully filed and sequenced, transforming an ordered archive into a mouldering mush on the floor. Several days of careful sifting produced maybe a thousand printable negatives, the rest remain on the floor in an increasingly jumbled mess.

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Aesthetics of display in a museum context

Gabriela Nicolescu, Phd candidate Department of Anthropology Goldsmiths, University of London Figure 1: The statue of Marx, Engels and Lenin in the back yard of the National Museum of the Romanian Peasant (NMRP) @ Marius Caraman/ 1991, Image Archive of the NMRP.

This image comes from the Image Archive of a museum. It was taken in 1991, two years after the fall of the Ceausescu’s regime in Romania. Even so, one can wonder what a statue of three famous communist ideologists has to do, even in the backyard, with an institution which mainly exhibits ethnographic objects. Another subject of reflection, that the image provokes, is the ambiguous situation in which the statue finds itself: near the garbage bins, but still covered with a roof as if protected.…

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Online Archive of Ivan Karp’s Publications Launched at Emory University

From Prof. Cory Kratz, Emory University:

 

Emory University recently launched an online archive of Ivan Karp’s (1943–2011) published papers in order to keep his work widely available. Karp was a social anthropologist and a leading scholar of social theory, museum and heritage studies, and African studies. He began his long-term research with Iteso communities in western Kenya in 1969. Karp wrote extensively about power, personhood and agency, about African societies and systems of thought, and he published groundbreaking work about museums and exhibitions.

The new online archive includes complete lists of Karp’s books and of the works published in the two book series for which he served as editor: the African Systems of Thought series at Indiana University Press and the Smithsonian Series in Ethnographic Inquiry at Smithsonian Institution Press.…

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