Tag Archives | Activism

Disobedient Objects

Hannah Knox, Lecturer in Digital Anthropology and Material Culture, UCL Anthropology Zapatistas. Attribution: Nathan Gibbs https://flic.kr/p/3eMx1h Licensed under Creative Commons.

Zapatistas. Attribution: Nathan Gibbsflic.kr/p/3eMx1hLicensed under Creative Commons.

 

In 1996 I worked in Mexico for eight months and during my time there visited the famous village of San Cristobal de las Casas in Chiapas. One of my abiding memories of San Cristobal was of the women from the village who were selling artisanal products to tourists on cloths laid out on the floor in the square in front of the church. Whilst the sale of artisanal objects was commonplace in Mexican villages, in amongst the traditional traditionally dressed dolls I had been surprised to see dolls sporting cloth balaclavas and guns. The dolls were a homage to Subcomandante Marcos and the 1994 uprising of the Zapatista Army of National Liberation (EZLN) against the Mexican government and its signing of the NAFTA free trade agreement with the United States.…

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Made in Palestine

Christopher Pinney, UCL

[Please note: this  post was written before the intensification of the current Israeli offensive on Gaza]

I decided to transgress the BDS (Boycott, Disinvestment and Sanctions) injunction and attend a conference on ‘The Photographic Imagination’ in Tel Aviv in June 2014 for several reasons.  The two central ones concerned, firstly, the Apartheid analogy. Having taught a short course at the University of Cape Town in 2000 it was quite apparent that there were many courageous dissident academic intellectuals that had been a key element of the resistance during the 1980s and earlier. Collaboration with them would have been quite different from buying South African produce. The second reason has an element of illogicality, which is repeatedly pointed out to me: Syria.…

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CFP: Bicicultures Roadshow: The Critical Bicycling Studies Tour de California

Image Courtesy of FreeFoto.com

Anthropologists who research bicycling, urban and otherwise, are invited to attend an experimental conference being held April 16-17th in Davis, California. The preferred deadline for submission of abstracts is Sunday, February 10th. More details below and at bicicultures.wordpress.com/2013/01/10/cfp/.

 …

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CFP: International Free Software Workshop 2013 (Porto Alegre, Brazil)

Deadline for Proposals: 20 February 2013

Website: softwarelivre.org/wsl

From the pioneer software sharing communities created around UNIX to the community of Emacs hackers and beyond, Free and Open Source Software (FOSS) development has been growing exponentially, following the popularization and widespread usage of personal computers and the Internet. Not only have FOSS communities expanded globally, but also its body of literature, becoming relevant for computer scientists and engineers, as well as for researchers in the humanities and social sciences. In the past decade, FOSS research was consolidated around questions such as individual motivation, collaborative practices, issues of scale, governance, and coordination of development efforts, as well as problems of political economy, involving the study of economic models, and forms of political mobilization around Free Software.

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Dumpster Diving

Aliine Lotman (Anthro Dept, EHI, Tallinn University)

“Until the 19th century, the term ‘to consume’ was used mainly in its negative connotations of  ‘destruction’ and ‘waste’.  Tuberculosis was known as ‘consumption’, that is, a wasting disease.  Then  economists came up with a bizarre theory, which has become widely accepted, according to which the basis of a sound economy is a continual increase in the consumption (that is, waste) of  goods”              (Petr  Skrabanek 1994: 29).

The activity of rummaging through rubbish for usable things is known by many names: dumpster diving, freeganism, skipping, recycling and so on. As the communities of people involved in this activity are not exactly homogenous, with a common ideology, it is not too certain where the different terms originate.…

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Neil Smith: 1954-2012

Originally published in the SocialistWorker.org on October 2, 2012

Neil Smith: A Passionate Scholar and Socialist

Bill Roberts, a founding member of the ISO, and Hector Agredano, a doctoral student at the CUNY Graduate Center, remember the life of a determined activist.

Neil Smith, the renowned scholar, beloved teacher and devoted activist, died on September 29 at the age of 58.

Neil is best known for his academic work. He was a professor of anthropology and geography at City University of New York. In particular, his writings on the patterns of social development in cities–drawing on history, economics, political and social theory, and ecological studies–are among the most prominent left- wing views on the subject.

But Neil will also be remembered as a committed socialist and activist. He came to the U.S.…

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The Painted King: Art, Activism, and Authenticity in Hawaii

Glenn Wharton, NYU Museum Studies and Museum of Modern Art, Painted%20King%20Book%20Cover.jpg I just published a book which describes my cultural research during the conservation of the Kamehameha I sculpture in North Kohala, Hawai’i. My aim is to show how ethnographic and participatory research during a conservation project can reveal complex networks of meaning invested in cultural objects. It also demonstrates how relationships between people and objects can inform conservation research and the hands-on work of cleaning, coating, and repair. The sculpture is particularly charged with fused meanings and it has an amazing physical history. It was commissioned by King Kalakaua and the Hawaiian legislature to celebrate the centennial of Captain Cook’s “discovery” of the Hawaiian Islands at a moment when American business interests were advocating an overthrow of the government.…

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