Archive | Conferences and other events

World Museums: Geographies and Genealogies

Via Felix Driver, Royal Holloway

May 19, 2015

World Museums: Geographies and Genealogies 

Institute of Historical Research, Senate House, 5.15pm

In conversation:

Anthony Shelton, Director of the Museum of Anthropology and Professor of Anthropology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada

Annie E. Coombes, Professor of Material and Visual Culture & Director of the Peltz Gallery, Birkbeck, University of London.

This HARC Dialogues event will focus on the idea of the world museum, as expressed originally in the concept of the universal or encyclopaedic museum, and reinvented for the twenty-first century in museums of world cultures: the world, its peoples and their objects, brought under one roof. What does it mean to define  the remit and audiences of museums as global? Does it matter where museums are located?…

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Crowd-sourcing and Crowd-funding our human past

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The MicroPasts project, an AHRC collaborative UCL-British Museum Project, uses web-based technologies to foster collaborations between researchers based in higher education and heritage institutions and members of the public to study the human past. Together, the project team has created new open archaeological data via crowdsourcing (crowdsourced.micropasts.org) and arranged the micro-financing of community archaeology and community history projects (crowdfunded.micropasts.org).

The MicroPasts end of first phase funding conference will be held at the Royal Geographical Society on the 31st March 2015. We look forward to welcoming you and tickets can be purchased online or via contacting us directly. The conference programme has now been finalised and features some very interesting speakers as shown below. Lunch is provided in the ticket price and there will be some free things to take away (apart from the knowledge shared) and we hope to film the speakers.…

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Cyclone Pam – Support Vanuatu

Haidy Geismar, UCL

As I’m sure you are all aware, last week Vanuatu was devastated by Cyclone Pam, battering the country with winds of over 270 mph. The storm knocked out the country’s telecommunications and transport infrastructure and now, just a few days later, it is estimated that more then 70% of the population are left homeless, without adequate drinking water, and without food. The long term prospects for food security are also bad as most of the garden crops that people live off have been destroyed. President Baldwin Lonsdale has announced that the storm had “wiped out” recent development and that “everything” would have to be rebuilt.

Vanuatu is the place that I have worked as an anthropologist since 2000. The places I have worked – Port Vila, Malakula, Ambrym – via the networks set in place by the Vanuatu Cultural Centre have all been either badly damaged or destroyed.…

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The Quest for the Good Life in Precarious Times: Grassroots perspectives on value in the 21st century

The Quest for the Good Life in Precarious Times: Grassroots perspectives on value in the 21st century

Manchester, The Martin Harris Centre, 24th  – 26th  March, 2015

 

The event is hosted by the ESRC-funded research project The Domestic Moral Economy: An ethnographic study of value in the Asia Pacific.  Over two days five research teams with overlapping inquiries will meet and present papers.  For full programme, descriptions of the projects and registration details, see our website  thequestforthegoodlife.wordpress.com

The conference begins at 4:30pm Tues 24 March, with a pre-conference seminar on Democratising the Study of Economics lead by five members of Manchester’s Post Crash Economics Society, chaired by Professor John O’Neill.

It ends at 5:30 Thurs. 26 March in a round table discussion on the conference theme chaired by Chris Gregory with the PIs of the five projects; Chris Hann, Susana Narotzky, Niko Besnier, Deborah James, Karen Sykes, and Jane Guyer.…

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Aesthetics and ethics: An enquiry into their relationship

 

A one-day workshop

​Wednesday 6 May 2015 9:30 am – 4 pm

Venue: Daryll Forde Seminar Room

Department of Anthropology

University College London

14 Taviton, London WC1H 0BW

 

Keynote speakers:

Christopher Pinney (University College London)

Roger Sansi-Roca (Goldsmiths)

 

Organizers:

Haidy Geismar

Elena Magdalena Craciun

  

The relationship between aesthetics and ethics has long been the topic of scholarly debates, from Kant’s (1928[1790]) insistence that the experience of beauty involved disinterested contemplation and, subsequently, the separation of aesthetics from ethics, or Wittgenstein’s (1961[1889]) enigmatic proposition that ‘ethics and aesthetics are one’, to the numerous enquiries into the ethical aspects of art and art criticism or the aesthetic aspects of moral life and moral evaluation (e.g. Bourdieu 1984, Foucault 1985, 1986, Eco 1986, Eagleton 1990, Guattari 1995, Korsmeyer 1998, Levinson 2001, Rancière 2006, Osborne and Tanner 2007).…

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CFP: 4S Conference 2015, Panel on technologies of representation

4S Conference 2015 – Denver, Colorado (USA), 11-14 November 2015

Call for Papers for Open Panel
From one thing to another: Technologies of representation in design and making

Panel Chairs:
Arlene Oak, Department of Human Ecology, University of Alberta (aoak@ualberta.ca)
Claire Nicholas, Department of Human Ecology, University of Alberta (cn4@ualberta.ca)

 

We would like to invite abstract submissions for an open panel at the 4S Conference (Society for the Social Study of Science) in Denver (11-14 November 2015).  The deadline to submit an individual paper abstract to the conference is March 29, 2015.  When you submit on the conference website, you will be prompted to indicate the panel to which you would like to contribute.  Please email Arlene or Claire if you anticipate submitting an abstract.…

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CFP: Interface Conference: Materiality and Movement (Carleton University)

Carleton University’s Interface Conference: Materiality and Movement, 1-3 May 2015

Keynote Speaker: Dr. Laurel Thatcher Ulrich, Harvard University

Made objects, unlike bodies that disintegrate – are trans-temporal. They are mobile and are continually moving across time and space, carrying within them stories and meanings that they have accumulated as a result of this mobility. In an increasingly interconnected world – where the meanings of mediatory agents are endlessly shifting, traveling and transforming – there is a growing need for critical inquiry that concerns the entangled nature of materiality, mediation and mobility. Themes of distance and nearness and the impact of movement on the material will be considered during this conference. Papers, panels or workshops are welcomed that investigate how contemporary and historical circulations of people and things across time and space have meaningful implications within the contexts of both the local and the global.…

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Heidelberg Summer School: Walking the Line – Art of Border Zones in Times of Crisis

Via Christiane Brosius, University of Heidelberg

The Cluster of Excellence “Asia and Europe in a Global Context” welcomes applications for the Summer School “Walking the line – Art of border zones in times of crisis.” It will take place from July 26 to 31, 2015 at Heidelberg University in Germany.

The summer school will engage with the production, circulation and the disruption of art and visual practices as they navigate the (thin) line between creative and destructive impulses in times when wars, struggles for national independence and conflicting ideologies result in border contestations and territorial partitions. These crises produce both immediate and enduring physical, economic and political consequences for persons living within affected regions, including flight from one’s homeland, traumatic histories left unprocessed between generations, and the elaboration of repressive political systems and surveillance.…

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CFP: Ethnographic Apps/ Apps as Ethnography (AAA 2015)

Ethnographic Apps/ Apps as Ethnography: Exploring Possibilities for a Locative, Multimedia and Collaborative Future.
A Panel Proposal for the American Anthropological Association (AAA) Meetings, November 2015

Panel Organizers: Sam Collins (Towson) and Matthew Durington (Towson)

We find it curious that anthropologists have paid relatively little attention to apps.  Yes, there are certainly apps that help in our ethnographic research, as well as apps that have long been utilized by artists, folklorists, community activists and many others to encourage people to “read” and experience space and place in interesting (and even subversive) ways.  But what about apps as part of our research, as, in other words, a form of ethnographic practice?  Apps facilitate embodied ideologies, and they mark the exact point of interpellation where structure and symbol meet practice and bodily hexis.  Apps show how institutions and other powerful agents are trying to structure the meaning of cities by combining mobile media and social media through organizing embodied narrative experiences.  Even when apps reproduce already existing content, they do so by structuring experiences in ways that are illustrative of networked power: the city as a series of connections and disconnections that bring some spaces and meaning together while effectively cutting off vast parts of the city from urban practice.  In other words, apps are technologies of inclusion and exclusion, and following their trail can tell us exactly how things like segregation work in an era of the actor network.…

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Analogue/Digital: Productive Tensions in Materiality and Archaeology

Via Sara Perry’s The Archaeological Eye

I’m so excited to be able to announce a forthcoming roundtable that Colleen MorganLaia Pujol-TostKathryn Killackey and myself are hosting at the European Association of Archaeologists (EAA) conference in Glasgow, 2-5 September, 2015. We would like to extend an invitation for participation to all of you in the archaeology and heritage communities who are grappling with questions around the nature and future of analogue/digital material relations. 

In other words, are you investigating issues at the intersections of the physical and the ephemeral? Are you enrolling digital technologies into the production of tangible experiences, or alternatively, aiming to better understand the digital through tangible forms of interaction? Have you eschewed the digital in favour of analogue engagements in your archaeological/heritage work – or have you rethought the dimensions of one via experimentation with the other?

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