Archive | Announcements and Listings

Call for papers: The art market in a global perspective

Via Olav Velthuis, University of Amsterdam

28-30 January 2016, University of Amsterdam, Department of Sociology

The aim of this multidisciplinary international conference is to bring together theoretical perspectives (ranging from sociology, anthropology, art history, economics and geography) that help advance our understanding of how art markets function, while offering high-level qualitative and quantitative empirical contributions to their local and global articulations. We particularly welcome contributions on emerging art markets in countries such as China, Russia, South Africa, Turkey, India or Brazil.

The conference seeks to delve into the shifting relationship between established and emerging art markets through a series of paper presentation and keynote sessions, as well as panel discussions with expert practitioners from the field (gallerists, artists, collectors, museum directors), drawing on experiences from a variety of geographical contexts.…

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Job Search: Professor of Photographic History, De Montfort University

Faculty of Art, Design and Humanities

On the retirement of Professor Elizabeth Edwards, applications are invited for the full-time, permanent post of Professor of Photographic History, based within the School of Humanities.

The successful candidate will be appointed as the Director of the Photographic History Research Centre which was established in 2010 and is already widely acknowledged as a world-leading centre for the interdisciplinary study of the history of photography in all its aspects. He or she will also be expected to contribute to the broader development of History and of Photography as subjects at De Montfort.

Applicants should have an international scholarly and/or curatorial reputation in one or more fields of photographic history, an outstanding publication record, and be able to demonstrate experience of research leadership and funding development.…

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From Home Movies to Homs

FromhomemoviestoHomsemail
The amateur film is becoming a global visual lingua franca, a consequence of the conjuncture of the digital with new and widely accessible film technologies (notably the camera phone) and new methods of distribution (open access video platforms, typified by YouTube). Amateur film now saturates online media discourse as well as personal and social media communication. Its ubiquity is one visible example of the current radical shift in media systems, whilst the films themselves are both reshaping the formal language of the moving image and refashioning the representation, mediation, and even the construction of the self. In these three workshops we propose to examine the history and present state of amateur film, beginning with amateur films shot in the British colonies, and stretching through to the use of amateur film in the ongoing conflict in Syria.
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Popular Art and Portuguese Identity. Anatomy of an Exhibition

An event with Professor Anthony Shelton

Thursday 21 May 2015, 6pm, Room G01, School of Arts, Birkbeck, University of London, 43 Gordon Square, London WC1H 0PD

Between the 1920s-1950s, rural popular art became an important part of the government-sponsored re-creation of Portuguese national identity and history. Books and articles were written about popular art, films were produced on it and domestic and international exhibitions displayed it, creating a particularly Portuguese ‘taste’ that hid the dire conditions of poverty, suffering, and illiteracy that characterized many of its rural provinces. Sixty-five years later, UBC MOA (Museum of Anthropology) will open a major exhibition on Portuguese popular art. This talk will discuss the complex mixture of ideologies and philosophies, which underlie the representation of popular art and national identity during the dictatorship (Estado Novo), its re-accommodation after the establishment of democracy in 1974, and the challenges of curating an exhibition that deals with historical imaginations.…

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Online Archive of Ivan Karp’s Publications: New Address and Site Design

by Corinne A Kratz, Emory U

The online archive of Ivan Karp’s published papers has moved and gotten a new look! Emory University launched the popular online archive in 2012 in order to keep Karp’s (1943–2011) work widely available. Karp was a social anthropologist and a leading scholar of social theory, museum and heritage studies, and African studies. He began his long-term research with Iteso communities in western Kenya in 1969. Karp wrote extensively about power, personhood and agency, about African societies and systems of thought, and he published groundbreaking work about museums and exhibitions.

The updated Ivan Karp Archive includes new photos and links and a new homepage design. The archive organizes Karp’s papers thematically, with sections devoted to Social Theory and African Systems of Thought; Museums, Exhibitions and Public Scholarship; African Philosophy; and the Iteso People of Kenya.…

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Guggenheim Wikipedia Edit-a-thon

Via Guggenheim.org

This month, the Guggenheim Museum is proud to donate 100 images of artworks to Wikipedia, including selections from the museum’s collection by Edgar Degas, Paul Klee, and Vincent van Gogh. Join us at the Guggenheim to add information about these artworks and artists to Wikipedia, the world’s largest free source of knowledge.

The event is an opportunity to explore the history of the Guggenheim’s collection, the impact of these works within the artistic movements of their time, and their legacy and influence on future artists. Using these 100 images as a starting point, we invite you to help enhance the scholarship and understanding of key artists and works in the museum’s collection.

The program will begin with an overview of the Guggenheim’s founding collection and its development by Natalia Lauricella, Curatorial Assistant, Collections and Exhibitions, followed by a presentation by Wikimedia NYC president Richard Knipel about the impact of donating images of artworks to Wikipedia.…

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World Museums: Geographies and Genealogies

Via Felix Driver, Royal Holloway

May 19, 2015

World Museums: Geographies and Genealogies 

Institute of Historical Research, Senate House, 5.15pm

In conversation:

Anthony Shelton, Director of the Museum of Anthropology and Professor of Anthropology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada

Annie E. Coombes, Professor of Material and Visual Culture & Director of the Peltz Gallery, Birkbeck, University of London.

This HARC Dialogues event will focus on the idea of the world museum, as expressed originally in the concept of the universal or encyclopaedic museum, and reinvented for the twenty-first century in museums of world cultures: the world, its peoples and their objects, brought under one roof. What does it mean to define  the remit and audiences of museums as global? Does it matter where museums are located?…

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Crowd-sourcing and Crowd-funding our human past

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The MicroPasts project, an AHRC collaborative UCL-British Museum Project, uses web-based technologies to foster collaborations between researchers based in higher education and heritage institutions and members of the public to study the human past. Together, the project team has created new open archaeological data via crowdsourcing (crowdsourced.micropasts.org) and arranged the micro-financing of community archaeology and community history projects (crowdfunded.micropasts.org).

The MicroPasts end of first phase funding conference will be held at the Royal Geographical Society on the 31st March 2015. We look forward to welcoming you and tickets can be purchased online or via contacting us directly. The conference programme has now been finalised and features some very interesting speakers as shown below. Lunch is provided in the ticket price and there will be some free things to take away (apart from the knowledge shared) and we hope to film the speakers.…

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Cyclone Pam – Support Vanuatu

Haidy Geismar, UCL

As I’m sure you are all aware, last week Vanuatu was devastated by Cyclone Pam, battering the country with winds of over 270 mph. The storm knocked out the country’s telecommunications and transport infrastructure and now, just a few days later, it is estimated that more then 70% of the population are left homeless, without adequate drinking water, and without food. The long term prospects for food security are also bad as most of the garden crops that people live off have been destroyed. President Baldwin Lonsdale has announced that the storm had “wiped out” recent development and that “everything” would have to be rebuilt.

Vanuatu is the place that I have worked as an anthropologist since 2000. The places I have worked – Port Vila, Malakula, Ambrym – via the networks set in place by the Vanuatu Cultural Centre have all been either badly damaged or destroyed.…

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Some current job opportunities for those with material culture interests:

Two Lecturers in Art Gallery and Museum Studies at the  University of Leicester

And:

Departmental Lecturer in Visual, Material and Museum Anthropology, Oxford University

Applications are invited for a Departmental Lecturer in Visual, Material and Museum Anthropology (VMMA) effective from 14 September 2015 to 30 June 2016. The post is part time (18.75 hours per week) based at the School of Anthropology, Banbury Road, Oxford. The role is needed for a limited time to provide cover for the teaching and administrative commitments of Professor Clare Harris who holds a Leverhulme Fellowship for this period.

The primary function of this post is to engage in teaching, examining and supervision for both undergraduates and the graduate programmes in VMMA. The School is seeking an inspirational teacher with both breadth and depth of knowledge of the key subject area of the post and a full command of the relevant literature.…

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