Archive | Announcements and Listings

The Hub Award: Collaborative Residency at the Wellcome Institute

via Alice Carey, Wellcome Institute

We are delighted to announce that Wellcome is now accepting applications for a new group of residents in The Hub, beginning at the end of 2018. The grant supports an interdisciplinary group of researchers and creative minds to collaborate on a project of up to 2 years and £1m which explores the cultural and social contexts of health. Wellcome will be holding two open days in The Hub (3-6pm Tuesday 14th March and Wednesday 12th April 2017) which will provide potential applicants with the opportunity to see the space and hear from Wellcome staff and the current Hub residents. Attendees will also have the opportunity to network and find potential collaborators. If you would like to attend one of the open days please register your interest here. For more details about what the award is, who can apply, how to apply, deadlines and contact details please visit The Hub Award page.

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Marketplace Icon series at Consumption Markets & Culture

From Jonathan Schroeder, Editor at Large, Consumption Markets & Culture Rochester Institute of Technology, New York

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The “Marketplace Icons” section of Consumption Markets & Culture features over 20 short papers which discuss a basic aspect of the marketplace – something that we cannot imagine living without. The series is intended to provide concise, useful, thought-provoking reflections on a set of icons essential to consumption markets and/or culture. Recent topics include Gary Cross on collecting, Michelle Weinberger on gifts, Rohit Varman on curry, Daniel Miller on denim, and Orvar Löfgren on mess. They are freely available for a limited time.

More information can be found here: explore.tandfonline.com/page/bes/gcmc-marketplace

 

 

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Call for Submissions for the John Collier Jr Award for visual excellence in the use of still photography

The John Collier Jr. Award for Still Photography is awarded periodically to an author or photographer whose publication, exhibit, website, or other multimedia production exemplifies the use of still photographs (both historical and contemporary) for research and communication of anthropological knowledge.  The submission must have a strong visual research perspective along with being good documentary photography and be within five years of the original publication date.

The project must be nominated by a current member of the American Anthropology Association and include a letter of consent of the person nominated. A letter of nomination from the AAA member and the supporting material (including name, book title or exhibit, website or multimedia production, publisher, author’s mailing address, phone and email) should accompany three copies of the creative work and be sent to the Committee Chairperson, which must be received by the deadline below.…

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Our Lives with Electric Things: Call for Contributions

Jamie Cross, University of Edinburgh

Call for Contributions (max 300 words)
In: Cultural Anthropology / Theorizing the Contemporary

Our lives with electric things are positively charged with meaning. Our bodies are electric, our hearts and minds pulsing with electrical activity. Electric things have hope and anxiety, possibility and danger. Our electric attachments are sacred and profane, personal and political. Electrically powered things mediate human sociality across time and space just as they mediate our ecological and inter-species relationships. At the beginning of the 21st century, in an epoch (the electrocene, perhaps) defined simultaneously by the global abundance and unevenness of electricity supply, our electric things simultaneously shock us into action and insulate us from change. Just as electrically powered goods, devices and appliances have transformed our possibilities for reproducing, nurturing and sustaining life (coming to define ideas of the good life) so too have they created new possibilities for controlling, managing, exploiting and ending life.

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Vacancy for Research Associate, AHRC Heritage Priority Area, UCL Institute of Archaeology

Postdoctoral Research Associate, AHRC Heritage Priority Area

University College London – UCL Institute of Archaeology

Salary: £34,056 to £41,163 per annum, inclusive of London Allowance

Hours: Full Time

Contract Type: Contract / Temporary

Closes: 10th February 2017

Job Ref: 1620928

The appointment will be on UCL Grade 7. The salary range will be £34,056 to £41,163 per annum, inclusive of London Allowance.

Applications for a full time Research Associate to support the work of the AHRC Heritage Priority Area Leadership Fellow are being sought. The Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC) have appointed a Heritage Priority Area Leadership Fellow (Professor Rodney Harrison) to act as an ambassador for the development of the intellectual agenda for the research field, engaging with communities across disciplinary boundaries and promoting collaboration within academia and beyond.…

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Vacancy: Head of Postgraduate Program, Victoria and Albert Museum

Reference: NOV20161155
Expiry date: 23:59, 16 December 2016
Location: South Kensington
Salary: £51,484.00 – £58,116.00 Per Annum
Benefits: Group Personal Pension, Life Assurance Scheme, and other great benefits
Further details: HeadofPostgraduateProgrammeJD_Nov2016.pdf
We are looking for a new Head of Postgraduate Programme for ’The History of Design and Material Culture.’ Taught in conjunction with the Royal College of Art, this is the preeminent programme in the field and it is growing in connection with exciting developments at both Museum and College. Reporting to the Director of Research and Collections and working closely with the Head of Programme at the Royal College of Art, the new Head will provide leadership for teaching and learning, research, and management of the resources of the programme and staff.
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Just published: Linm number 7 Public Infrastructures/Infrastructural Publics

Limn Number 7: Public Infrastructures/Infrastructural Publics
Edited by Stephen J. Collier, James Christopher Mizes, and Antina von Schnitzler

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Infrastructure has always 
had a privileged relationship to both expertise and the public in modern government. But in the early 21st century, this relationship is inflected in novel ways. The purposes public infrastructure was meant to serve—welfare, quality of life, economic development, and so on—persist. But they are often conceptualized differently, promoted by different agencies, and articulated through novel technological and collective relations. This issue of Limn explores new formations of infrastructure, publicness, and expertise.The contributions examine how new forms of expertise conceive the public and make claims in its name, how publics are making novel claims on experts (and claims to expertise), and how earlier norms and techniques of infrastructure provisioning are being adapted in the process.…

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New Radio Program: Objects of Desire

Every day this week, Radio Four will air “Objects of Desire” at 12.04, which explores some of the main concerns of Material Culture Studies:

This is the story of how the things we accumulate around us say more than we might imagine about who we are.

“The fate of the object,” said the French thinker Jean Baudrillard, “has been claimed by no-one.” Unless, of course, the object in question is the Mona Lisa or the Albert Jewel. In these programmes, Matthew Sweet will be looking at the other stuff. The cups. The spoons. The knick-knacks. The things we might keep, even if we don’t quite have the room for them.

Through the prism of what people have in their homes, Objects of Desire explores the work of sociologists and anthropologists like Pierre Bourdieu and Mary Douglas, and philosopher Gaston Bachelard, in order to understand the curious mixture of display, memory, emotion and chance that informs the objects we surround ourselves with.

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Bard Graduate Center Research Fellowships

Bard Graduate Center invites scholars from university, museum, and independent backgrounds with a PhD or equivalent professional experience to apply for funded research fellowships, to be held during the 2017–18 academic year. The theme for this period is “What is distance?” Applicants are asked to address in a cover letter how their projected work will bear on this question. The fellowships are intended to fund collections-based research at Bard Graduate Center or elsewhere in New York, as well as writing or reading projects in which being part of our dynamic research environment is intellectually valuable. Eligible disciplines and fields of study include—but are not limited to—art history, architecture and design history, economic and cultural history, history of technology, philosophy, anthropology, and archaeology.…

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