Author Archive | Haidy Geismar

Social Museum Seoul: Review

Jane Yoonjeong Rhee, Slade School of Fine Art, UCL

 

“The Social Museum is a democratic space of civil society that envisions a neutral zone of values. We begin a chapter jointly to sympathise with our shared time, space, values, heritage, and the sense of indebtedness to the society.” (Translated from the Exhibition Text)

Social Museum is an annual conference that takes the museum as its conceptual parameters to capture and re-evaluate the urgencies in our society. The project is funded by Seoul City Hall and is part of the research program for the governmental plan of building Seoul Innovation Park in the centre of Seoul. In partnership with Seoul City Hall (Seoul Metropolitan Government), the development of the overall idea and the materialization of the event were led by the art director of Takeout Drawing & Museum, an alternative cafe-museum space located in Seoul.…

Continue Reading 0

World Museums: Geographies and Genealogies

Via Felix Driver, Royal Holloway

May 19, 2015

World Museums: Geographies and Genealogies 

Institute of Historical Research, Senate House, 5.15pm

In conversation:

Anthony Shelton, Director of the Museum of Anthropology and Professor of Anthropology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada

Annie E. Coombes, Professor of Material and Visual Culture & Director of the Peltz Gallery, Birkbeck, University of London.

This HARC Dialogues event will focus on the idea of the world museum, as expressed originally in the concept of the universal or encyclopaedic museum, and reinvented for the twenty-first century in museums of world cultures: the world, its peoples and their objects, brought under one roof. What does it mean to define  the remit and audiences of museums as global? Does it matter where museums are located?…

Continue Reading

Crowd-sourcing and Crowd-funding our human past

image003

The MicroPasts project, an AHRC collaborative UCL-British Museum Project, uses web-based technologies to foster collaborations between researchers based in higher education and heritage institutions and members of the public to study the human past. Together, the project team has created new open archaeological data via crowdsourcing (crowdsourced.micropasts.org) and arranged the micro-financing of community archaeology and community history projects (crowdfunded.micropasts.org).

The MicroPasts end of first phase funding conference will be held at the Royal Geographical Society on the 31st March 2015. We look forward to welcoming you and tickets can be purchased online or via contacting us directly. The conference programme has now been finalised and features some very interesting speakers as shown below. Lunch is provided in the ticket price and there will be some free things to take away (apart from the knowledge shared) and we hope to film the speakers.…

Continue Reading

Knyttan and the question of design autonomy

Lydia Maria Arantes | Visiting Researcher, Anthropology, UCL

 

http://www.somersethouse.org.uk/visual-arts/knyttan-factory-of-the-future source: www.somersethouse.org.uk/visual-arts/knyttan-factory-of-the-future ]

 

Have you ever wanted to design your own scarf, jumper or even tie, but can’t knit?‘ read the first sentence on the Somerset House website introducting Knyttan – Factory of the Future , currently based in the New Wing. Despite already knowing how to knit, I was nonetheless interested to what extent visitors of Knyttan would be granted involvement in the design process. Having been doing research on (hand) knitting for the past few years, I was obviously curious about this unusual combination of industrial production and individuality, and visited the Factory of the Future on February 28th 2015 to find out for myself.

Upon entering the room, I was immediately drawn to the garments laid out on the shelves and hung on the wall.…

Continue Reading

Cyclone Pam – Support Vanuatu

Haidy Geismar, UCL

As I’m sure you are all aware, last week Vanuatu was devastated by Cyclone Pam, battering the country with winds of over 270 mph. The storm knocked out the country’s telecommunications and transport infrastructure and now, just a few days later, it is estimated that more then 70% of the population are left homeless, without adequate drinking water, and without food. The long term prospects for food security are also bad as most of the garden crops that people live off have been destroyed. President Baldwin Lonsdale has announced that the storm had “wiped out” recent development and that “everything” would have to be rebuilt.

Vanuatu is the place that I have worked as an anthropologist since 2000. The places I have worked – Port Vila, Malakula, Ambrym – via the networks set in place by the Vanuatu Cultural Centre have all been either badly damaged or destroyed.…

Continue Reading

Some current job opportunities for those with material culture interests:

Two Lecturers in Art Gallery and Museum Studies at the  University of Leicester

And:

Departmental Lecturer in Visual, Material and Museum Anthropology, Oxford University

Applications are invited for a Departmental Lecturer in Visual, Material and Museum Anthropology (VMMA) effective from 14 September 2015 to 30 June 2016. The post is part time (18.75 hours per week) based at the School of Anthropology, Banbury Road, Oxford. The role is needed for a limited time to provide cover for the teaching and administrative commitments of Professor Clare Harris who holds a Leverhulme Fellowship for this period.

The primary function of this post is to engage in teaching, examining and supervision for both undergraduates and the graduate programmes in VMMA. The School is seeking an inspirational teacher with both breadth and depth of knowledge of the key subject area of the post and a full command of the relevant literature.…

Continue Reading

The Quest for the Good Life in Precarious Times: Grassroots perspectives on value in the 21st century

The Quest for the Good Life in Precarious Times: Grassroots perspectives on value in the 21st century

Manchester, The Martin Harris Centre, 24th  – 26th  March, 2015

 

The event is hosted by the ESRC-funded research project The Domestic Moral Economy: An ethnographic study of value in the Asia Pacific.  Over two days five research teams with overlapping inquiries will meet and present papers.  For full programme, descriptions of the projects and registration details, see our website  thequestforthegoodlife.wordpress.com

The conference begins at 4:30pm Tues 24 March, with a pre-conference seminar on Democratising the Study of Economics lead by five members of Manchester’s Post Crash Economics Society, chaired by Professor John O’Neill.

It ends at 5:30 Thurs. 26 March in a round table discussion on the conference theme chaired by Chris Gregory with the PIs of the five projects; Chris Hann, Susana Narotzky, Niko Besnier, Deborah James, Karen Sykes, and Jane Guyer.…

Continue Reading

The Sophie Coe Prize in Food History 2015

The Sophie Coe Prize is the longest-running and most generous prize for writing in food history in the English language, awarding £1,500 to the winning essay, article or book chapter every year. First given in 1995, the prize was founded in memory of Sophie Coe, the eminent food historian who died in 1994. It focuses on great writing about new research and/or new insights into the study of the history of food.

In 2015, our 20th anniversary year, the winner will be chosen – as usual – by an anonymous panel of distinguished judges and awarded to the author of an original, informative article or essay on any aspect of food history. Published and unpublished work may be submitted. If the former, it must have been published within the last 12 months of the submission deadline.…

Continue Reading

Narrative Objects: The Sakha Summer Festival and Cultural Revitalization: PhD opportunity

Via Alison Brown, University of Aberdeen

 

The University of Aberdeen is currently offering an Elphinstone Scholarship fee-waiver for a PhD student to be affiliated with the ‘Narrative Objects: The Sakha Summer Festival and Cultural Revitalization’ project, co-directed by Dr. Alison Brown and Dr. Tatiana Argounova-Low in the Department of Anthropology. This is one of several Elphinstone Scholarships currently available in the department. The start date of the PhD would be September 2015.

Information on the Elphinstone Scholarship application process can be found here:
www.abdn.ac.uk/cass/graduate/elphinstone-scholarships-373.php

Proposed topics that the student might address are available here:
www.abdn.ac.uk/cass/graduate/anthropology-381.php

Continue Reading

Aesthetics and ethics: An enquiry into their relationship

 

A one-day workshop

​Wednesday 6 May 2015 9:30 am – 4 pm

Venue: Daryll Forde Seminar Room

Department of Anthropology

University College London

14 Taviton, London WC1H 0BW

 

Keynote speakers:

Christopher Pinney (University College London)

Roger Sansi-Roca (Goldsmiths)

 

Organizers:

Haidy Geismar

Elena Magdalena Craciun

  

The relationship between aesthetics and ethics has long been the topic of scholarly debates, from Kant’s (1928[1790]) insistence that the experience of beauty involved disinterested contemplation and, subsequently, the separation of aesthetics from ethics, or Wittgenstein’s (1961[1889]) enigmatic proposition that ‘ethics and aesthetics are one’, to the numerous enquiries into the ethical aspects of art and art criticism or the aesthetic aspects of moral life and moral evaluation (e.g. Bourdieu 1984, Foucault 1985, 1986, Eco 1986, Eagleton 1990, Guattari 1995, Korsmeyer 1998, Levinson 2001, Rancière 2006, Osborne and Tanner 2007).…

Continue Reading

Powered by WordPress. Designed by Woo Themes