Author Archive | Haidy Geismar

Exploring Digital-Visual Anthropological Research Methods: www.photoblogiran.com

[This is an invited post from a PhD student working at Oxford University, accompanied by a series of comments about visual methods from PhD students working at UCL]

Shireen Walton, PhD candidate in Anthropology, Institute of Social and Cultural Anthropology, University of Oxford

shireen.walton@sant.ox.ac.uk

Oxford Digital Ethnography Group (OxDEG)/www.facebook.com/groups/OXDEG/

 

In June 2013, after nine months of ethnographic fieldwork researching Iranian popular photographic practices in Iran, the UK and online, my principal participants (Iranian photobloggers, based inside and outside of Iran) and I discussed the idea of co-curating a digital photography exhibition of their work. The idea of developing an innovative, site-specific methodology emerged during the research process, but seemed appropriate given that a) it reflected what photobloggers do – they create digital exhibition spaces in the form of photoblogs to share their photographs with viewers across the world – and b) it would establish a relevant digital environment in which to participate and observe their practices.…

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Disobedient Objects

Hannah Knox, Lecturer in Digital Anthropology and Material Culture, UCL Anthropology

Zapatistas. Attribution: Nathan Gibbs https://flic.kr/p/3eMx1h Licensed under Creative Commons.

Zapatistas. Attribution: Nathan Gibbs
flic.kr/p/3eMx1h
Licensed under Creative Commons.

 

In 1996 I worked in Mexico for eight months and during my time there visited the famous village of San Cristobal de las Casas in Chiapas. One of my abiding memories of San Cristobal was of the women from the village who were selling artisanal products to tourists on cloths laid out on the floor in the square in front of the church. Whilst the sale of artisanal objects was commonplace in Mexican villages, in amongst the traditional traditionally dressed dolls I had been surprised to see dolls sporting cloth balaclavas and guns. The dolls were a homage to Subcomandante Marcos and the 1994 uprising of the Zapatista Army of National Liberation (EZLN) against the Mexican government and its signing of the NAFTA free trade agreement with the United States.…

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London Conference in Critical Thought – Call for Stream Proposals

UCL, University of London, 26-27 June 2015

Call for Stream Proposals

We’re pleased to announce that LCCT 2015 will be hosted by the UCL department of Anthropology and supported by the UCL Joint Faculty Institute of Graduate Studies, the UCL department of Geography and the London Contemporary Dance School.

The call for streams is now open for the 4th annual London Conference in Critical Thought (LCCT). The conference is a space for those who share theoretical approaches and interests, but who frequently find themselves at the margins of their department or discipline. LCCT is an inter-institutional, non-hierarchical, and accessible event which makes a particular effort to embrace emergent thought and foster new avenues for critically orientated scholarship and collaboration.

There is no pre-determined theme for the conference.…

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Mellon Emerging Curatorial Postdoctoral Fellowship (Asia), UBC

The Museum of Anthropology (MOA) and the Department of Art History, Visual Art and Theory (AHVA) at the University of British Columbia invite applications for an Emerging Curatorial Postdoctoral Fellowship with a focus on Asia to begin May 1 or June 1, 2015. The fellowship, funded by the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, is open to recent doctoral graduates for one year, with possibility of renewal for another year. Salary for this position is expected to be $45,000 per year plus benefits, but may vary, commensurate with qualifications and experience.  In addition, the postdoctoral fellow will be provided with some travel/research funds. This position is subject to final budgetary approval.

This postdoctoral fellowship opportunity will afford a unique curatorial and research experience for an emerging curator, providing him/her with invaluable, hands-on curatorial experience.…

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Changes afoot at Material World Blog

Some of you more regular readers may have noticed that we’ve been posting less at material world blog of late. When Danny Miller and I started the blog in 2006 the blog was a way for me to keep my connection to the vibrant material culture group in the Anthropology Department at UCL where I had been a doctoral student as well as to connect UCL to the broader interest in material culture developing in the US. Since 2006 we have had a series of dedicated editors and editors-at-large, based all over the place, who have regularly provided content ranging from exhibition and book reviews through to notes from the field and good links. One of the things I’ve liked most about the site is that is its commitment to many voices and the space it has given to students and to scholars whose first language is not English to present their ideas.…

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Civilisation, Infrastructure and the City

Friday 7th Nov, 9:45-15:00
UCL Taviton 433, 16 Taviton Street, London WC1H 0BW

civcity.wordpress.com/

The world is concurrently urbanising and digitising, and both phenomena are routinely admitted amongst the most important drivers of change in the 21st century. Yet, how do processes of urbanisation and digitisation affect the creation and perpetuation of everyday local culture? Are they mechanical drivers which deterministically imprint themselves on society or is the question of their efficacy a more complicated matter?

 This one-day workshop will explore these questions, contextualising them with recent research from the field. Held with the generous support of the UCL Centre for Research into the Dynamics of Civilisation (CREDOC), it will bring together researchers from the fields of urban studies, human geography, digital anthropology, finance and ICT for development. The workshop will be held at UCL on November 7th.

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Cultures of Mending: A collaborative workshop

Mending is a multifaceted practice.  It has long-established roots spanning centuries of human productive effort.  Today it is experiencing a revival as a result of grassroots innovation movements and initiatives which seek to foster repair, re-use, upcycling and other creative forms of waste prevention.

Whilst it may be argued that mending practices never went away for some (Bond et al. 2013; Hackney 2013), in recent decades they have largely been marginalised by more spectacular and conspicuous forms of contemporary consumption, leisure and/or domestic practice, as well as the widespread acceptance of product ‘disposability’ (Cooper 2005; van Nes 2010).  Yet – and partly as a direct response to the phenomena of premature product obsolescence – an enthusiastic minority has remained committed to the political potential of mending as a critique of capitalist society (e.g.…

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Call for Papers: Photography in Print

Via Prof. Elizabeth Edwards, De Montfort University
22-23 JUNE 2015
Photographic History Research Centre De Montfort University, Leicester, UK

The 2015 PHRC Annual International Conference will address the complex and wide range question of ‘photography in print.’ The conference aims to explore the functions, affects and dynamics of photographs on the printed page. Many of the engagements with photographs, both influential and banal, are through print, whether in newspapers, books, magazines or advertising. We would like to consider what are the practices of production and consumption? What are the affects of design and materiality? How does the photograph in print present a new dynamic of photography’s own temporal and spatial qualities? In addition, photography can be said to be ‘made’ through the printed page and ‘print communities’.

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Museums at the Crossroads: Local Knowledge, Global Encounters May 14-21, 2015

Via Jason Jackson, Mathers Museum

The Indiana University Mathers Museum of World Cultures and School of Global and International Studies invite applications for up to eight Museum Partners who will take part in an innovative international workshop on the future of museums of culture and history. The call for applications for Museums at the Crossroads: Local Knowledge, Global Encounters closes November 15, 2014.

Across the world, as academically based scholars of social and cultural theory graft new shoots onto the older disciplinary roots of their work, their counterparts in the museum are drawing new meaning from the artifacts and images that fill their galleries and storerooms. This project leverages Indiana University’s resources in both humanities scholarship and museum practice to bring those groups together-marrying global theorists with practitioners of learning in localized, sensory environments, and asking what each can teach the other about the ties that join world cultures.…

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Review Essay: “After the Return: Digital Repatriation and the Circulation of Indigenous Knowledge”

This critical examination of the 2013 double issue of Museum Anthropology Review (MAR), entitled “After the Return: Digital Repatriation and the Circulation of Indigenous Knowledge,” (volume 7, numbers 1-2) was written by our spring 2014 class on the Anthropology in and of Museums, as part of the Museum Studies MA Program at New York University.  Contributors included Brittany Darrow, Christina Fernandez, Mary Kate Gliedt, Houda Lazrak, Jacqueline Masseo, Maria Montenegro, Edward Ovadek, and Laura Williams; and the project was overseen by our professor, Dr. Sabra Thorner (who facilitated class discussion on the journal issue and its broader context in Anthropology and Museum Studies, and had a final editorial role over the contents).  We’d like to collectively thank Barbara Mathé, Museum Archivist and head of Library Special Collections at the American Museum of Natural History (AMNH) in New York, who planted the seed for this idea and participated actively in several conversations about this issue’s contents and significance; and Jim Enote, Director of the A:shiwi A:wan Museum and Heritage Center at Zuni, New Mexico, who was a guest speaker in our class during the process.
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